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Cardiothoracic Surgery

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Welcome to Cardiac Surgery

US News & World Report Best Hospitals

Cardiac Surgery at Weill Cornell Medicine|NewYork-Presbyterian offers both proven surgical modalities and new, minimally invasive approaches for the treatment of coronary artery disease, thoracic aortic aneurysm, valvular disease, arrythmias and adult congenital heart disease. Read More. 

NewYork-Presbyterian & Weill Cornell Medicine - Cardiothoracic Surgery

Ronald O. Perelman Heart Institute

The Ronald O. Perelman Heart Institute is the new home for world-class heart care at Weill Cornell Medicine|NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital. The facility sets the standard for patient-focused comprehensive care for New Yorkers and patients throughout the world.

William Acquavella Heart Valve Center

The specialists at the William Acquavella Heart Valve Center at Weill Cornell Medicine|NewYork-Presbyterian are leaders in the development and evaluation of novel, less invasive techniques for repairing and replacing damaged mitral, aortic and pulmonary valves. Our team played a leading role in the clinical trials assessing the latest percutaneous valve replacement approaches, giving us more experience than most centers in these emerging new techniques.

Phone: 646-NYP-VALVE (646-697-8258)
Email: cornellheartvalve@nyp.org

Weill Cornell Medicine Cardiothoracic Surgery 525 East 68th Street
Box 110
Suite M 404
New York, NY 10065 Directions
Phone: (212) 746-5166

News

The Push–Pull of Industry in Interventional Cardiovascular Trials

Patrice Wendling

June 03, 2020

One in five trials (16.2%) were not prospectively registered before the start of enrollment, and at least one major discrepancy existed between the registered and published primary outcome in 38% of registered trials.

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Type of Sponsorship Associated with Differences Between Trials for Invasive Cardiovascular Treatments

Mario Gaudino, ROMA Trial, CABG, Invasive Cardiovascular Treatments, cardiovascular diseaseIn randomized clinical trials, commercial sponsorship influences how studies are designed and the results reported in ways that often benefit the study’s sponsor, Weill Cornell Medicine and NewYork-Presbyterian investigators report in a new study. The findings underscore the need to improve study design, reporting and guidelines to avoid bias in these trials, the authors say.

The study, published June 1 in JAMA Internal Medicine, focuses on coronary, vascular and structural interventional cardiology, and vascular and cardiac surgeries because of the enormous burden cardiovascular disease places on public health. In the United States, it accounts for approximately 800,000 deaths per year and 6 percent of total dollars spent on healthcare. A rigorous approach to evaluating new interventions for heart disease is critical.

“In medicine in general, but in particular cardiovascular medicine, we see randomized clinical trials as the best form of evidence,” said lead author Dr. Mario Gaudino, a professor in cardiothoracic surgery and director of translational and clinical research in cardiothoracic surgery at Weill Cornell Medicine, and a cardiovascular surgeon at NewYork-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell Medical Center. “Our practice is very heavily influenced by the results of randomized clinical trials. If those trials are not properly performed and reported, there’s a risk that we use the wrong strategy and don’t treat patients in the best possible way.”

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Recent invasive CV trials fall short on certain design aspects

Contemporary randomized clinical trials assessing invasive CV interventions are often small with short follow-up and limited power to identify large treatment effects, according to a study published in JAMA Internal Medicine.

The study also found that commercially supported trials were linked to differences in results, design and reporting. In particular, commercially supported trials were more likely to report favorable outcomes than other trials, and to report findings inconsistent with the trial results.

In this cross-sectional study, Mario F.L. Gaudino, MD, FEBCTS, Stephen and Suzanne Weiss Professor of Cardiothoracic Surgery at Weill Cornell Medicine, and colleagues analyzed data from 216 randomized clinical trials focused on vascular, coronary and structural interventional cardiology and vascular and cardiac surgeries.

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